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  Date:12th Jan 2012

IBM and GLOBALFOUNDRIES's partnership chip factory in U.S. starts 32nm production

GLOBALFOUNDRIES and IBM newest semiconductor factory called "Fab 8" in Saratoga County, New York State has started maiden production run of microprocessors based on IBM's latest 32nm silicon-on-insulator chip technology.

"Today's announcement is a natural extension of our longstanding partnership with IBM that includes production of 65nm and 45nm chips at our fabs in Singapore and Germany," said GLOBALFOUNDRIES CEO Ajit Manocha. "With the addition of our newest factory in New York, we will now be jointly producing chips with IBM at four fabs on three continents."

New York's "homegrown" HKMG technology offers cost-savings, better performance

GLOBALFOUNDRIES says its new Fab 8 campus, located in the Luther Forest Technology Campus about 100 miles north of the IBM campus in East Fishkill, stands as one of the most technologically advanced wafer fabs in the world and the largest leading-edge semiconductor foundry in the United States. When fully ramped, the total clean-room space will be app`s per month. Fab 8 to make both 32/28nm nodes chips and also designed for even lower nodes.

As per the release this fab will also "Gate First" approach to High-k Metal Gate (HKMG) that has reached volume production in GLOBALFOUNDRIES' Fab 1 in Dresden, Germany. This approach to HKMG offers higher performance with a 10-20% cost saving over HKMG solutions offered by other foundries, while still providing the full entitlement of scaling from the 45/40nm node, claims, GLOBALFOUNDRIES.

The new chips made from this fab also said to feature IBM's eDRAM (embedded dynamic random access memory) technology, which are claimed by IBM to improve on-processor memory performance in about one-third the space with one-fifth the standby power of conventional SRAM (static random access memory).


 
          
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